Angerstein Railway

On this blusteriest of days for some time, let this photo be a little reminder that it’s an ill wind that blows no one any good.

Back in 2010, after a not-entirely-ill blast, the fence had blown down up by the Angerstein Railway and Julian Watson (whose name appears in the credits of practically every Greenwich book written in the last 20-odd years, and sometimes on the title page) decided to have a peek at what’s usually pretty hard to get to. This is literally the end of the line.

I always think it’s rather wonderful that Greenwich has its own little branch line entirley dedicated to freight. There are very, very few left; most have closed and even fewer actually directly serve the Thames (you can see iron track lines in several places round the Thames Path where other bably lines used to run.)

Over the years people have mentioned they think this one’s closed too but you only have to stand a little while in any one of several places, my favourite being the roundabout just past Sainsburys on the Peninsula, before you see the slightly surreal image of a diesel engine creeping over the bridge towards the aggregates yard at Angerstein Wharf (built by the son of John Julius Angerstein, of Monster Hunter fame…)

There’s an excellent history of the railway here so I’m not going to reinvent the wheel by repeating it here.

If you want to get a look at it, you never know, today could be a good day. On the occasions I’ve tried to get a closer peek (by taking the little offshoot on the right hand side of the footbridge over the 102(M) that leads from Westcombe Park to Charlton, the extremely severe cattlegrids served their purpose, keeping both hooved animals and Phantoms off the tracks. But after all this wind you never know, there might be a fence panel down…


the attachments to this post:

end of the angerstein line Julian Watson
end of the angerstein line Julian Watson


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